Samuel Mallory Photography Samuel Mallory Photography

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Your BRAIN wants you to use FALSE COLOR | Explained


Our brains can be tricked fairly easily because we see light and color based on relative information. In this video, I explain how false color can prevent our brains from being tricked and provide us with a clear understanding of our camera's exposure levels.

I'll also give you my false color set-up for log (S-log3) and Rec709 (S-Cinetone) profiles.

I used a SmallHD 5" Focus monitor for this set-up which allows for the creation of custom False Color profiles.

When using S-Log 3 on Sony Alpha cameras, I map this false color output:
0-10 IRE — Light below the Black Point of S-Log 3 (Dark Purple)
10-15 IRE — Light approaching the Black Point of S-Log 3 (Light Purple)
38-44 IRE — 18% Grey for S-Log 3 which shows up as 41 IRE (Blue)
65-75 IRE — Skin tone bracket 1 (Peach)
75-80 IRE — Top end of Skin tone bracket (Orange)
90-94 IRE — Light approaching the White Point of S-Log 3 (Yellow)
94-100 IRE — Light above the White Point of S-Log 3 (Red)

When using S-Cinetone on Sony Alpha cameras, I map this false color output:
0-5 IRE — Light approaching the Black Point of S-Cinetone (Dark Purple)
55-65 IRE — Skin tone bracket 1 (Peach)
65-70 IRE — Top end of Skin tone bracket (Orange)
94-100 IRE — Light approaching the White Point of S-Cinetone (Red)

*You could also add specific clipping points for Rec709 / S-Cinetone depending on your ISO level and color profile. S-Cinetone seems to be at about 1.5 IRE and 95-100 IRE.

00:00 Your brain and relative perception of light
02:05 What is False Color?
03:03 How do we use False Color?
03:41 How I set up False Color for Log Profiles
05:05 How I set up False Color for Rec709 Profiles
05:56 Using False Color



White Balance | Some things you might not know and how to get it right!

Why do we measure color temperature in degrees Kelvin??

This video breaks down some of the misleading concepts of white balance - in a fun way - and determines if something like a "gray card" can help you get your white balance right.

I'll briefly describe how color temperature works, how your camera interprets light in a given environment through it's different metering modes, and finally give you my thoughts on using a grey card.

00:00​ Intro
00:47​ The basics of White Balance
01:14​ Why do we measure color temperature in Kelvin?
02:19​ How light changes in our environment
02:59​ Why I think of color temperature backwards
04:27​ How your camera interprets white balance
05:01​ Metering Modes
06:00​ The problem with Auto White Balance
07:05​ Where a neutral grey reference card fits in
08:20​ 3 Tips to get it right | #1 When your camera gets it wrong
08:49​ #2 When using multiple cameras
10:00​ #3 When you might need it later
10:30​ My caveat on grey cards for photography
11:20​ The End



Is this the Wide Angle lens you NEED?


Sigma has been making some incredible, affordable glass and the 14-24mm f/2.8 DG DN Art -- designed specifically for Sony E-mount and Leica L-mount mount is NO EXCEPTION. Checkout my review of the lens and let me know what you think!

0:00 Start
0:51 Aesthetics and Build Quality
1:55 Image Quality
3:45 Other Notes
6:12 Why Don't I Have this Lens Anymore? (i.e. Storytime)
7:19 The Verdict
8:31 More Image Samples!



Ultra Wide Lenses | You NEED to Know THIS!


Ultra wide lenses can be an incredibly useful, unique tool for photography but there is one thing that you need to understand to make the most out of them: perspective distortion.

Perspective distortion is the way in which a camera lens manipulates the apparent distance between near and far objects. In telephoto lenses, this creates the appearance, or perception, of compressing the foreground with the background. Ultra wide lenses do just the opposite and stretch the distance between near and far objects; seemingly "pulling in" foreground objects and "pushing away" background elements.

Check out the video for more information and tips and tricks on how to make the most of ultra wide lenses.

Please like and subscribe and comment with what you would like to see next!

The ultra wide lenses I used for the imagery in this video:
Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 Art lens
Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L



The 50mm "Dream" Lens? | Voigtlånder Nokton 50mm f/1.2 Review


Not all 50mm lenses are equal, and I bit the bullet and bought the $1,050 Voigtlånder Nokton 50mm f/1.2 for Sony E-mount. Here are my thoughts on this unique, expensive, manual focus lens.